Audi e-tron Impresses at Pikes Peak Ahead of World Debut

Every new vehicle undergoes a wide array of tests before it hits the market and the upcoming Audi e-tron, the brand’s first all-electric SUV, has just delivered an impressive performance at Pikes Peak—only instead of climbing up the famous Colorado mountain, it spent time going downhill.

Audi says the e-tron will travel more than 400 kilometres on a full charge, but it also uses an energy recuperation system that is variable and thus the most efficient among all the competitors.

On its 31-km downhill drive, the electric SUV fed so much energy back to the battery that it could cover approximately the same distance again. In other words, each kilometre downhill brought around an additional kilometre in range. Of course, the difference in altitude of about 1900 metres provided the necessary conditions for this incredible feat.

Overall, the Audi e-tron’s recuperation system contributes to up to 30 percent of its range. It involves both the two electric motors and the electrohydraulically integrated brake control system. For the first time, three different recuperation modes are combined: manual coasting recuperation using the shift paddles, automatic coasting recuperation via the predictive efficiency assist, and brake recuperation with smooth transition between electric and hydraulic deceleration.

For over 90 percent of all decelerations, the conventional brakes are not required, making one-pedal driving possible. They are involved only when the driver slows down by more than 0.3 g using the brake pedal. Audi says they respond extremely quickly thanks to a new electrohydraulic actuation concept: only 150 milliseconds separate the initiation of the deceleration and the presence of maximum brake pressure between the pads and discs. Consequently, braking distances are shortened by up to 20 percent compared with a conventional brake system.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering: the Audi e-tron is pretty good at accelerating, too, with less than six seconds to go from 0 to 100 km/h and a top speed electronically limited at 200 km/h. A boost mode increases power from 355 to 402 hp and torque from 414 to 490 lb.-ft. for eight seconds.

The production version of the all-new Audi e-tron will make its global debut on September 17 in San Francisco.Full specifications, including U.S. pricing, will be available at that time. Details for the Canadian market will be announced later.

Share on Facebook

More on the subject

NewsAudi e-tron quattro concept offers 500 km of driving range
Of all the negative connotations surrounding electric vehicles, the one that's hardest to shake has to be a lack of range. For all their fossil fuel-free advantages, EVs just can't keep up, at least in terms of distance, to their internal combustion counterparts. Well Audi is out to change that …
NewsAudi Confirms e-tron GT for Production
Audi announced at its annual press conference this week that it will aim to bring the four-door e-tron GT to market in the next few years. The move comes as part of the automaker’s plan to make more electric vehicles. The four-door sedan was teased in a prototype sketch. From …
First Drives2019 Audi Q8: The New Face of Audi SUVs
BMW has the X6, Mercedes-Benz has the GLE Coupe, and now Audi will introduce its Q8 to Canada in the first quarter of 2019. Foreshadowed by the Q8 sport concept unveiled at the Geneva Auto Show in March 2017, the new Q8 borrows several features from the recent A6, A7 …
Previews2019 Audi e-tron Quattro: This is the Production Vehicle
SAN FRANCISCO, California – The Car Guide flew to San Francisco for the world premiere of the 2019 Audi e-tron quattro electric-powered SUV. A prototype of the e-tron quattro was shown at the Geneva Auto Show earlier this spring and, since then, about 250 test vehicles have been driven by …
First Drives2019 Audi e-tron Quattro: Driving the Prototype in Namibia
BITTERWASSER, Namibia – There’s a gathering storm over the horizon on the wide expanse known as the Salt Pan in Bitterwasser, on the edge of the Kalahari Desert in Namibia. A huge dust cloud is getting bigger and bigger, and you quickly realize that this sandstorm isn’t caused by the …
Comments